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Ene 01 Reduction of energy use and carbon emissions

Number of credits available Minimum standards
12 Yes

Aim

To recognise and encourage buildings designed to minimise operational energy demand, primary energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

Assessment criteria

The following is required to demonstrate compliance:

Up to twelve credits - Energy performance

  1. Calculate an Energy Performance Ratio for New Constructions (EPR NC). Compare the EPR NC achieved with the benchmarks in Table 25 and award the corresponding number of BREEAM credits.

Table 25 Ene 01 EPR NC benchmark scale

    Minimum standards
BREEAM credits EPR NC Rating Minimum requirements
1 0.075
Requires a performance improvement progressively better than the relevant national building regulations compliant standard (see Other information ).
2 0.15
3 0.225
4 0.30
5 0.375 Excellent Requires 5 credits to be achieved (equivalent to an EPR of at least 0.375).
6 0.45
7 0.525
8 0.60 Outstanding Requires 8 credits to be achieved (equivalent to an EPR of at least 0.6).
9 0.675
10 0.75
11 0.825
12 0.90 AND zero net regulated CO2 emissions*.

* Note: Zero net regulated CO2 emissions are only required to achieve the maximum number of credits (12). There is no additional CO2 minimum requirement for any BREEAM rating.

A description of how the EPR NC is calculated from a building's modelled operational energy performance, primary energy consumption and CO2 emissions is provided in the Methodology section.

Note: The four countries of the UK have their own building regulations for energy and while they use the same methodology and approved calculation software, each have different definitions of the notional building and set different requirements for regulatory compliance i.e. baseline performance. This is accounted for in the BREEAM NC 2014 Ene 01 methodology through the ‘translator curves’ defined for each country. Therefore, the EPR NC and the BREEAM credits are determined by comparing the assessed buildings modelled operational energy performance relative to the regulatory baseline for the country in which the building is located. See compliance note CN4.

Exemplary level criteria

The following outlines the exemplary level criteria to achieve up to five innovation credits for this BREEAM issue:

Up to four credits - Zero regulated carbon

  1. The building achieves an EPR NC 0.9 and zero net regulated CO2 emissions (see Relevant definitions ).
  2. An equivalent percentage of the building's modelled ‘regulated’ operational energy consumption, as stipulated in Table 26 , is generated by carbon neutral on-site or near-site sources and used to meet energy demand from ‘unregulated’ building systems or processes.

Five credits - Carbon negative

  1. The building is ‘carbon negative’ in terms of its total modelled operational energy consumption, including regulated and unregulated energy (see Relevant definitions in the Additional information section of this issue).

Table 26 Innovation credits

Innovation credits Equivalent % criteria
1 10%
2

20%

3 50%
4

80%

5 > 100%

Checklists and tables

None.

Compliance notes

Ref

Terms

Description

Shell and core

CN1 

Applicable assessment criteria

Energy performance, criterion 1

Option 1 - Shell only: Calculate an Energy Performance Ratio just for the building’s heating and cooling energy demand only (EPR ED). Compare the EPR ED achieved with the EPR NC in Table 25 'Ene 01 EPR NC benchmark scale' with the EPR ED substituted for the EPR NC. Award the corresponding number of BREEAM credits.

The exemplary credits for this issue are not applicable for shell only.

Option 2 - Shell and core only: All assessment criteria relevant to the building type and function apply.


Refer to Appendix D – BREEAM UK New Construction and Shell and Core Project Assessments for a more detailed description of the above shell and core assessment options.

CN1.1 

Building services efficiencies not known

Option 2 - Shell and core:

Where the building services efficiencies are not known, for example where they are not within the remit of the shell and core developer (i.e. where services will be provided as part of the fit-out works), services complying with the minimum energy efficiency standards or backstop levels required by the relevant national building regulations should be used for the energy modelling

CN1.2 

Green fit-out agreement
(See Relevant definitions .)

Option 2 - Shell and core:

For the purposes of this BREEAM assessment, it is permissible, when conducting the energy modelling, for the design team to substitute the minimum energy efficiency standards or backstop levels required by the relevant national building regulations for the performance specifications confirmed within a green fit-out agreement. This is permissible provided that the performance specification forms part of, or is referenced within, a fit-out agreement which is, or will be, contractually required of the tenant(s) in their fit-out works. This rule applies only to those areas of the building that the scope of the green fit-out agreement covers. Speculative areas of the assessed building development not fitted out or covered by the scope of such an agreement must assume the minimum energy efficiency standards or backstop levels required by the relevant national building regulations in the energy model, and no better.

Simple buildings

CN2 

Applicable assessment criteria All criteria relevant to the building type and function apply.
General

CN3 

Extensions to existing buildings

See criterion 1.

Where an existing building is being extended (and only the new extension is being assessed) and that extension uses existing building services plant, the energy modelling must be based on the building fabric of the new extension and any existing, common, building services plant and new building services plant installed that will service the new extension.

The energy modelling does not have to consider the existing building fabric where this will not form part of the scope of the BREEAM assessment. Nor does it have to consider existing building services where they are not supplying services (heating, cooling and/or ventilation) to the new extension being BREEAM-assessed.

CN3.1 

Renewable and low carbon installations

Where included as part of the project and therefore assessed under this BREEAM issue, the installation of low or zero carbon technologies can be used to offset CO2 emissions arising from regulated and, in the case of exemplary credits, unregulated energy consumption. The LZC technology can be installed on-site or near site where a private wire arrangement is in place (see Ene 01 Reduction of energy use and carbon emissions).

CN3.2 

Zero carbon sources of energy - double counting

See criteria 2-4.

The project team must avoid double counting the energy from the zero carbon source. This may be particularly relevant where that source of energy generation is being accounted for in terms of the assessed building’s regulated CO2 emissions and/or it will contribute to offsetting other buildings' CO2 emissions, which are not part of this assessment.

CN3.3

Mixed use buildings assessed using SAP or SAP and SBEM
See criterion 1.

In some instances, BREEAM-assessed buildings with residential areas may have been classified under the domestic building regulations and will therefore have had their energy use modelled using the domestic assessment method, SAP, as well as or instead of SBEM. Further guidance on assessing a building's Ene 01 performance where SAP is used is provided in the Other information section for this assessment issue.

CN3.4 

Building assessed as part of a larger development Where the building under assessment forms part of a larger development and either a new or existing LZC installation is provided for the whole site, then the amount of LZC energy generation counted for in this issue, and subsequent CO 2 emissions saved, should be proportional to the building’s energy consumption compared to the total energy consumption for the site.

CN3.5 

Estimating energy demand from unregulated building systems/processes At present there is no standard or national calculation methodology for modelling unregulated energy demands in a building. To demonstrate compliance with the ‘exemplary level criteria’ the building’s modelled operational ‘regulated’ energy consumption is therefore used as a proxy for a building’s unregulated energy demand, i.e. unregulated energy equals 100% of regulated energy. While not accurate, this approach enables BREEAM to assess and award credits for buildings that meet a proportion of its unregulated energy demand via on-site or near-site renewable energy sources. Where unregulated energy demand for the building can be accurately predicted, then this data can be used to determine the percentage of unregulated energy demand met via renewable energy sources. Unregulated energy demand could be estimated on the basis of metered data from a similar or the same building type with the same unregulated system/process loads or by using the methodology described in CIBSE TM54: 2013, 'Evaluating Operational Energy Performance of Buildings at the Design Stage, 2013' 1CIBSE TM54: 2013, Evaluating Operational Energy Performance of Buildings at the Design Stage.
Country specific

CN4

Building regulations for energy

The following lists the building regulations that are used to define each country’s BREEAM ‘translator curve’ for the purpose of benchmarking building energy performance relative to a regulatory baseline and awarding credits for this issue.

Scotland

Technical Handbook 2010 Non Domestic, Section 6 Energy

Technical Handbook 2015 Non Domestic - Energy.

Use whichever building regulations are relevant for the assessed building.

Northern Ireland

Technical Booklet F2 2012 Conservation of fuel and power in buildings other than dwellings

England

Approved Document Part L2A 2010 Conservation of fuel and power in new buildings other than dwellings, 2013 edition - for use in England

Wales

At the time of writing, the building regulations for energy for Wales are under development. A draft of Approved Document Part L2A 2010 Conservation of fuel and power, New buildings other than dwellings, 2014 edition, has been published. These regulations take effect in July 2014.

Methodology

The methodology for the EPR NC calculation considers three metrics of modelled building performance when determining the number of credits achieved for this issue. The three metrics are:

  1. The building’s heating and cooling energy demand
  2. The building's primary energy consumption
  3. The total resulting CO2 emissions.

These three metrics for the actual modelled building performance are compared against the relevant national building regulations compliant standard (i.e. a baseline) and each is expressed as a percentage improvement. The percentage improvements are then compared against modelled building stock and 'translated' into a ratio of performance for each metric. These ratios are then weighted for each metric and added together to determine the overall Energy Performance Ratio (EPR NC).

The calculation is determined using the following performance data from annual energy modelling of the building’s specified/designed regulated fixed building services and fabric, as undertaken by an accredited energy assessor using approved building energy calculation software:

  1. Building floor area ( m²)
  2. Notional building heating and cooling energy demand (mJ/ m²)
  3. Actual building heating and cooling energy demand (mJ/ m²)
  4. Notional building primary energy consumption (kWh/ m²)
  5. Actual building primary energy consumption (kWh/ m²)
  6. Target Emission Rate (TER) (kg CO2 / m²)
  7. Building Emission Rate (BER) (kg CO2 / m²).

The necessary energy modelling data required to determine building performance is sourced from National Calculation Method compliant energy modelling software, used by the design team to demonstrate building regulation compliance. This data is then entered into the BREEAM Ene 01 calculator to determine the EPR NC and number of credits achieved. The Ene 01 calculator is within the BREEAM assessment scoring and reporting tool, in the Assessment issue scoring tab, Energy section.

The methodology summarised above is described in greater detail in Guidance Note 12 to be provided on the BREEAM website.

Evidence

Criteria Interim design stage
Final post construction stage
2-4

One or more of the appropriate evidence types listed in The BREEAM evidential requirements section can be used to demonstrate compliance with these criteria.

1

A copy of the Building Regulations Output Document from the approved software. The output documents must be based on the design stage of analysis.

A copy of the Building Regulations Output Document from the design stage SAP calculations (where relevant for multi-residential buildings)

As per interim design stage, but with the output documents from the approved software reflecting performance at the as built stage of analysis. This must account for any changes to the specification during construction and the measured air leakage rate, ductwork leakage and fan performances (as required by building regulations).
2-4

As above, plus evidence confirming:

  1. The total carbon neutral energy generation (kWh/yr)
  2. The source of the carbon neutral energy
  3. Calculated estimate of energy consumption from unregulated systems/process (kWh/yr) (only required if confirming zero regulated carbon or carbon negative exemplary credits)
  4. Calculated estimate of exported energy surplus (only required if confirming carbon negative status).
As required above and as per interim design stage.

Additional information

Relevant definitions

Accredited energy assessor
A person registered with an accredited energy assessment scheme provider. The scheme provider will be licensed by the relevant government department to accredit competent persons in the energy assessment of non-domestic/domestic buildings for the purposes of demonstrating compliance with the building regulations in the country of origin. The energy assessor should be appropriately accredited for the building being assessed.
For a full list of approved accreditation schemes/organisations for energy assessors and links to registers of accredited energy assessors visit:
  1. Wales: https://www.ndepcregister.com (non-domestic), www.epcregister.com (domestic)
  2. Scotland: www.gov.scot/
  3. Northern Ireland: www.epbniregisternd.com (non-domestic), www.epbniregister.com (domestic)
  4. England: www.ndepcregister.com (non-domestic), www.epcregister.com (domestic)
Approved building energy calculation software
Software approved for the purpose of demonstrating compliance with the energy efficiency and carbon emission requirements of the building regulations (and in turn compliance with the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) recast 2012. The definition includes the Simplified Building Energy Model (SBEM) and its interface iSBEM, as well as third party software approved by the relevant government department.
A list of approved software for non-domestic buildings is as follows:
  1. Wales: www.ncm.bre.co.uk
  2. Scotland: http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Built-Environment/Building/Building-standards/techbooks/sectsixprg
  3. Wales, Northern Ireland and England: http://www.ncm.bre.co.uk/
  4. England: http://www.ncm.bre.co.uk.
Approved building energy calculation software will provide the data required for calculating the EPR NC and BREEAM Ene 01 credits.
Please note that for dwellings (where relevant to the assessment of multi-residential buildings), the government’s Standard Assessment Procedure for the Energy Rating of Dwellings (SAP) may be used. The current version is SAP 2012 version 9.92 (October 2013). See also compliance note CN3.3 regarding the use of SAP outputs in multi-residential building assessments.
Building Emission Rate (BER)
The building CO2 emission rate expressed as carbon dioxide emissions per square metre per year (kg CO2 / m² /year). The BER is calculated in accordance with the National Calculation Methodology (NCM) and the Simplified Buildings Energy Model (SBEM).
Building regulations
Building regulations set standards for the design and construction of buildings to ensure the safety and health of people in or about those buildings. They also include requirements to ensure that fuel and power is conserved and facilities are provided for people, including those with disabilities, to access and move around inside buildings.
In Scotland, they also aim to secure the welfare and convenience of persons in or about buildings and to further the achievement of sustainable development. See CN4 for details of the relevant documents for each country.
Carbon negative building
A building/site that generates, surplus to its own energy demand, an excess of renewable or carbon neutral energy and exports that surplus via the national grid to meet other, off-site energy demands, i.e. the building is a net exporter of zero carbon energy.
Surplus in this respect means the building/site generates more energy via renewable/carbon neutral sources that it needs to meet its own regulated and unregulated energy needs. Any surplus must be exported through the national grid as additional capacity to that required by the Renewables Obligation i.e. Renewable Obligation Certificates are not claimed/sold for the renewable energy generation (see definition of Renewables Obligation Certificate).
This definition of carbon negative focuses only on energy and carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the operational stage of the building life cycle (as this is the stated aim of this assessment issue). It does not take into account the embodied carbon, in terms of carbon fixing or emissions resulting from the manufacture or disposal of building materials and components (these impacts/benefits are dealt with in Mat 01 Life cycle impacts).
Carbon neutral
Carbon neutral means that, through a transparent process of calculating building operational emissions, reducing those emissions and offsetting residual emissions, net carbon emissions equal zero. This includes carbon emissions from both regulated and unregulated energy consuming plan and systems. See the 'Zero net regulated CO2 emissions' definition also.
Controlled service or fitting
The building regulations for energy performance of buildings define this as a service or fitting in relation to which the building regulations imposes a requirement.
Dwelling Emission Rate (DER)
The DER is the estimated carbon dioxide emissions per square metre per year (kg CO2 / m² yr) for the dwelling as designed. It accounts for energy used in heating, fixed cooling, hot water and lighting. It is the equivalent of the BER for dwellings.
Dynamic simulation model (DSM)
A software tool that models energy inputs and outputs for different types of buildings over time. In certain situations, SBEM will not be sophisticated enough to provide an accurate assessment of a building’s energy efficiency. In these cases government-approved proprietary dynamic simulation models may be used.
Energy demand
The building energy provided for end uses in the building such as space heating, hot water, space cooling, lighting, fan power and pump power. Energy demands are the same as room loads. One of the outputs from the Building Regulations Output Document is for heating and cooling energy demand only, not for any other building energy uses. Heating and cooling energy demands are influenced by factors including building fabric heat loss, air permeability, glazing and shading.
Energy Performance Ratio for New Constructions (EPR NC)
A metric that is unique to BREEAM and calculated by the BREEAM Ene 01 Calculator within the BREEAM Assessment Scoring and Reporting tool, using modelled outputs from the approved building energy calculation software. It is a ratio that defines the performance of a BREEAM-assessed building in terms of its regulated operational heating and cooling energy demand, primary energy consumption and CO2 emissions. This measure of performance is used to determine the number of Ene 01 credits a building achieves in the BREEAM assessment. A description of how the EPR NC is defined and calculated is summarised in the Methodology section and outlined in greater detail in Guidance Note 12.
Fixed building service
The building regulations for energy performance of buildings define this as any part of, or any controls associated with:
  1. Fixed internal or external lighting systems but does not include emergency escape lighting or specialist process lighting; or
  2. Fixed systems for heating, hot water service, air-conditioning or mechanical ventilation.
Green fit-out agreement
A formal contractually binding agreement between a building developer/owner and their tenant(s). As such, a green fit-out agreement (or ‘green’ clauses/sections in a lease agreement) can be used as evidence demonstrating compliance with the relevant BREEAM issue criteria at the interim design and final post construction stages of assessment. The agreement should make specific reference to the specification requirements/levels claimed, and as defined by BREEAM in this technical manual, where credits are awarded.
BREEAM aims to encourage a mutually beneficial relationship between the shell and core developer/owner of a building and its future tenant(s) so that the fully fitted operational building achieves performance against the highest possible environmental standards. In order to achieve this, BREEAM encourages and rewards the use of formal legally binding green fit-out agreements between a developer/owner and their tenant. Where a legally binding green fit-out agreement is provided as evidence and it commits the tenant’s fit-out to meet the criteria of this BREEAM issue, credits are available to be awarded.
Minimum energy efficiency standards
Minimum energy efficiency standards are the minimum acceptable values for each type of service required by the building regulations for Wales, Northern Ireland and England, as set out in the Non-Domestic Building Services Compliance Guide.
They are called 'minimum acceptable efficiencies' in the Technical Booklet F2 for Northern Ireland.
They are called 'Limiting services efficiencies' in Part L2A for England.
Low or zero carbon (LZC) technologies
A low or zero carbon technology provides a source of energy generation from renewable energy sources or from a low carbon source such as combined heat and power (CHP) or ground source heat pumps (GSHP).
National Calculation Method (NCM)
The National Calculation Method (NCM) enables quantification of building operational energy consumption and CO2 emissions resulting from regulated building services/systems and fabric performance. The NCM is the methodology used for demonstrating compliance with the European Union Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) 2012 (recast). Building energy modelling compliant with the NCM can be carried out using approved software (see Relevant definition of Approved building energy calculation software).
The full details are described in the NCM Modelling Guide for the relevant country:
  1. www.2013ncm.bre.co.ukhttp://www.gov.scot/Topics/Built-Environment/Building/Building-standards/techbooks/techhandbooks/ncmg2015
  2. Northern Ireland: NCM Modelling Guide (2010) 2 National Calculation Methodology (NCM) Modelling Guide (for buildings other than dwellings) in England and Wales, 2010 Edition (revision January 2013) www.ncm.bre.co.uk, www.ncm.bre.co.uk
  3. England: NCM Modelling Guide (2013), www.ncm.bre.co.uk.

Use whichever building regulations are relevant for the assessed building

Notional building
A hypothetical building of the same size, shape, orientation and shading as the actual building, with the same activities, zoning and system types and exposed to the same weather data, but with pre-defined specified properties for the building fabric, fittings and services.
The notional building is concurrent with the national building regulations for Wales 2014, Northern Ireland 2012 and England 2013.For Scotland 2013, the ‘notional’ building is generated based upon a building designed to meet the 2002 standards and a percentage improvement is applied to define the compliant building target carbon dioxide emission rate (TER).
Near-site LZC
A low or zero carbon source of energy generation located near to the site of the assessed building. The source is most likely to be providing energy for all or part of a local community of buildings, including the assessed building, e.g. decentralised energy generation linked to a community heat network or renewable electricity sources connected via private wire.
On-site LZC
A low or zero carbon source of energy generation which is located on the same site as the assessed building.
Primary energy
Energy from fossil fuel and renewable sources that has not undergone any conversion or transformation process. Primary energy is transformed by the means of energy generation used and its transmission to the building.
Primary energy consumption
This refers to the direct use at the source, or supply to users without transformation, of crude energy, that is, energy that has not been subjected to any conversion or transformation process.
Private wire arrangement
In the context of BREEAM for low or zero carbon technology installations, a private wire arrangement is where any electricity generated on or in the vicinity of the site is fed directly to the building being assessed, by dedicated power supplies. If electricity is generated which is surplus to the instantaneous demand of the building, this electricity may be fed back to the national grid. The carbon benefit associated with any electricity fed into the grid in this manner can only be allocated against an individual installation or building. In cases where a building is supplied by a communal installation, no carbon benefit can be allocated to buildings which are not connected to the communal installation.
Regulated energy
Building energy consumption resulting from the specification of a controlled, fixed building services and fittings, including space heating and cooling, hot water, ventilation and lighting.
Renewables Obligation Certificate (ROC)
This is a green certificate issued to an accredited generator for eligible renewable electricity generated within the UK and supplied to customers by a licensed electricity supplier. One ROC is issued for each megawatt hour (MWh) of eligible renewable output generated 3www.ofgem.gov.uk.
Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) for Energy Rating of Dwellings
The government’s approved methodology for assessing the energy performance of new dwellings. The current version is SAP 2012 version 9.92. The procedure accounts for energy used in:
The Simplified Building Energy Model (SBEM)
SBEM is software developed for DCLG by BRE. SBEM is a computer program that provides an analysis of a building’s energy consumption. It calculates monthly energy use and carbon dioxide emissions of a building (excluding dwellings) based on a description of the building geometry, construction, use and HVAC and lighting equipment. SBEM is accompanied by a basic user interface, iSBEM. There also exists alternative approved software ‘front-end’ interfaces for SBEM (see definition of Approved building energy calculation software).
Target Emission Rate (TER)
The target emission rate is the minimum energy performance requirement (required by building regulations) for a new non-domestic building (kgCO2 / m² yr). The TER is calculated in accordance with the National Calculation Methodology (NCM) and the Simplified Buildings Energy Model (SBEM). For dwellings, the TER is calculated using the SAP methodology according to the requirements defined in the building regulations for dwellings. The TER is expressed in terms of the mass of CO2 emitted per year per square metre of total useful floor area of the building (kgC O2 / m² yr).
Unregulated energy
Building energy consumption resulting from a system or process that is not ‘controlled’, i.e. energy consumption from systems in the building on which the Building Regulations do not impose a requirement. For example, this may include energy consumption from systems integral to the building and its operation, e.g. lifts, escalators, refrigeration systems and ducted fume cupboards; or energy consumption from operational-related equipment e.g. computers, servers, printers, photocopiers, laptops, mobile fume cupboards, cooking, audio-visual equipment and other appliances.
Zero net regulated carbon emissions
The annual building net regulated CO2 emissions (kg CO2 / m² yr) arising as a result of annual energy consumption from fixed building services, i.e. space heating and cooling, domestic hot water, ventilation and lighting, also referred to as controlled services and fittings, as a result of requirements imposed on such systems by the building regulations.
In aiming to achieve a zero regulated carbon status, the building energy modelling can take account of contributions of energy generated from on-site and near-site renewable and low carbon installations. Energy generated and supplied from off-site renewable and low carbon installations cannot be used to meet this definition.

Other information

Allowable solutions

The term 'allowable solutions' forms part of the proposed zero carbon definition. A consultation on allowable solutions is ongoing (at the time of writing). Once an official definition of allowable solutions is confirmed by the government for non-domestic buildings, BRE will advise accordingly on the contribution of allowable solutions towards achieving BREEAM credits.

Building regulations classifications for multi-residential buildings

Multi-residential buildings that can be assessed under BREEAM New Construction 2014 will be classified under either the non-dwelling version of the relevant building regulations or a combination of the non-dwelling and dwelling of the building regulations, as outlined in compliance note CN3.3. For England, Wales and Northern Ireland, areas classified under their relevant building regulations documents, Approved Documents (AD) Part L2A and the NI Technical Handbook F2, are classed as ‘buildings other than dwellings’. However this does also include ‘rooms for residential purposes’ (see below). Areas classified as Part L1A or Technical Handbook F1 are ‘self-contained dwellings’. The Part L/Technical Handbook F classification impacts this BREEAM issue in that areas classified as Part L2A/F2 must be assessed using SBEM and areas classified as Part L1A/F1 must be assessed using SAP. For Scotland, see the General section and Appendix A of the Technical Handbook Non-Domestic for definitions of domestic and non-domestic buildings.

Room for residential purposes

The building regulations for Wales, Northern Ireland and England give the following definition: Room for residential purposes means a room, or suite of rooms, which is not a dwelling-house or a flat and which is used by one or more persons to live and sleep and includes a room in a hostel, a hotel, a boarding house, a hall of residence or a residential home but does not include a room in a hospital, or other similar establishment, used for patient accommodation.

Guidance for assessing Ene 01 performance in buildings that contain residential areas

Guidance for assessing performance where the building has been modelled using SAP only

The relevant data must be sourced from the SAP data sheet from the approved software (provided by the Accredited energy assessor). This data must first be entered in to the 'Ene 01 Supplementary Calculator for Multi-Residential Buildings Using SAP'. The calculator converts the data into the outputs outlined in the Methodology section. Once converted by the Ene 01 Supplementary Calculator, the outputs should be entered into BREEAM’s Ene 01 Calculator in the BREEAM Assessment Scoring and Reporting tool. This calculator will then confirm the Energy Performance Ratio (EPR) and number of BREEAM credits achieved.

The Ene 01 Supplementary Calculator for Multi-Residential Buildings Using SAP describes in detail what data to source from the SAP data sheet(s).

Guidance for assessing performance where the building has been modelled using SAP and SBEM

Where the building has been classified under both the non-dwelling and the dwelling regulations, because it contains both residential and non-residential areas, two sets of energy performance data will be required: one set from SBEM for the non-domestic areas; and one from SAP for the self-contained dwellings.

The relevant SAP data must first be entered into the 'Ene 01 Supplementary Calculator for Multi-Residential Buildings Using SAP'. This calculator converts the data into the outputs outlined in the Methodology section. This converted SAP data along with the relevant outputs from SBEM must then be added to BREEAM’s Ene 01 Calculator in the BREEAM Assessment Scoring and Reporting Tool. This calculator will then confirm the Energy Performance Ratio (EPR) and number of BREEAM credits achieved.

Where both SBEM and SAP outputs are used, the total credits achieved are determined by area weighting the credits achieved for the domestic and non-domestic parts of the building. The area weighted totals are then added together and rounded down to the nearest whole credit. The same method of area weighting is applied to the percentage improvement on the building's Target Emission Rate. The area weighted credits and percentage improvement are the totals used to determine compliance with BREEAM’s Ene 01 minimum standards.


BREEAM UK New Construction non-domestic buildings technical manual 2014
Reference: SD5076 – Issue: 5.0
Date: 23/08/2016
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